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20121202
20121210
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. we are endlessly reminded that everything must be on the table, including defense, which accounts for about 20% -- as you probably know -- of the budget. but defense doesn't really seem to be on the table in terms of widely-discussed solutions or strategies. instead, we confront sequestration, a thoroughly bad idea for getting a defense budget or any other budget. unless we take action, we could face a fiscal or economic crisis that forces cuts to our military priorities, steep and arbitrary cuts that are neither coherent, nor prioritized. the question is, can we and how do we achieve savings that can improve our fiscal outlook while meeting our national security needs? to quote admiral mullen again, he said the pentagon budget was basically doubled in the last decade, and in doubling we have lost the ability to prioritize. to make hard decisions, to do tough analyses, to make trades. we also need a review of our defense strategy that makes sure that we are preparing for the threats and risks of the 21st century, not those of the past. the foundation has funded two efforts along t
command, one of the six unified geographic departments in the department of defense. what you may not know is that general ham is the only four star general currently serving in the army who started off as an enlisted enininfantry man. on my business, they talk about self-made entrepreneurs with great respect. i think we have one of the great self-made generals. general ham's service spans the nobody, including saudi aabe ya, qatar, macedonia and iraq. and what a career he has had. before taking the lead at u.s. africom, general ham was the commander of europe. mike his decorations, the defense superior medal. the legion ofmeter with two oak leaf clusters, the bronze star medal and the joint service commendation medal. it's a privilege to have general ham with us here today, and on behalf of everyone assembled i'd like to thank him for his service to the country. please join me in welcoming general ham the floor and thanking the homeland policy institute for convening this event. general ham. [applause] >> i think you can probably abbreviate that introduction and say, i'm a pretty old sold
of seamless experience they deserve, then our job, secretary of veterans apairs and secretary of defense, we have to make it clear there's got to be good cooperation at all levels. this effort can want be about surf. it's got to be about serving our veterans. i'm very encouraged that the level of collaboration between the two departments, i believe, better than it's ever been in the past, yet, we have to reach much deeper into a level of collaboration that will meet needs of our veterans. we owe it to them to give them the tools they need to put their lives back together and pursue their goals whether it's getting a good education, best health care, or axeling in a new government, serving in government, or starting a business. as i said before, this is, in many ways, a national security issue. it goes to the heart of taking care of the people that fight for us, and ensuring that we can then recruit the very best force that's possible. part of that is making sure we maintain faith with our troops and with our families. we have to give them confidence that they have world class support systems
with the national park service and with the department of defense to bring events like this throughout the year and band concerts throughout the summer. this memorial is a very sacred place where we come to visit, to remember, to reflect, and commemorate the defining moment of world war ii. and to honor those who served both on the battle front and on the home front, and the families that were left behind. this me memorial honors more than the 16 million men and women who served in the arm forces during world war ii. and more than 400,000 of those men and women never rushed home -- returned home. and additional millions that supported the war effort from america's arsenal of democracy and from our farmlands on this home front. the world war ii generation fought the most destructive war in history. they fought that war against great odds, not only did they fight and win that war, and safe save this nation. they literally saved the world. this nation will never forget our world war ii veterans, all of our veterans and their families, and especially those who gave all their tomorrows. as a 18-year
rubio -- [inaudible] >> a defensive back coach, wasn't my fault. we didn't give up a pass, neither was there one attempted to be fair. it was a tremendous amount of fun. my seven my seven euros first year playing tackle football, so i had as much fun doing not if they ever had. >> we have a lot of new coaches and here. how do you connect? >> it's got to be fun for them. the most important thing you can do is not just about been a better player. if you can teach a kid early on to catch a ball, hold the ball right and tackle the proper form coming to keep them safe and having fun. it's very difficult to break labor. with a focus on head injuries they teach my kids how to tackle appropriately. >> and to make it fun, how do you do that? >> winning is fun winning is fun for me sicilia strikes were winning. it forces you to work with other people to accomplish your goal, particular on the particular on the offense is that there's very little you can do by yourself. you can be the best running back in the world, but if your box unexecuted come you can't get anywhere. i think that applies
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5